patterned art

Moving On-Completed by Lisa Goesling

Moving on by Lisa Goesling

Moving on by Lisa Goesling

Detail of Moving On by Lisa Goesling

Detail of Moving On by Lisa Goesling

Another Detail of Moving On by Lisa Goesling

Another Detail of Moving On by Lisa Goesling

My mark making took me on a journey from creating what I thought would be a vertical piece, to one that worked best horizontally. The only thing I planned was to use both found objects and abstract designs...from there I just trusted what would happen as I dragged my X-ACTO knife across the board. From a composition standpoint, I wanted to keep the eye moving yet invite the viewer to stop when landing on something interesting. Subtle textures support the bolder shapes as they glide across the page. The hint of a dragonfly's wings, circular shapes forming a wasps nest on the lower right, even little people that I love to draw, hidden in the gap above the shell like structure on the left. I enjoy completing a piece that looks well thought out even though I simply allowed it be flow. 

Bark by Lisa Goesling

Bark by Lisa Goesling

Bark by Lisa Goesling

I've walked past this incredible tree for twenty-five years. Eastern Cottonwoods have been known to live up to 300 years; who knows how many people have stopped to marvel at this majestic beauty right by the creek, with its deep fissures and subtle colors. I always knew that some day it would become my muse, now is that time. I finally dove in after photographing it from every angle and studying it up close. Capturing the complex structure of the bark with it's multiple layers, sent me on a journey of deep discovery into form and pattern. Bark is one of several pieces that will ultimately make up my birds nest cube 'sculpture'. 

Mother Nature by Lisa Goesling

Top: Art of a Catkin from a Pussy Willow and a Fingerprint. Bottom: Lacy Leaf and Dragonfly by Lisa Goesling

Top: Art of a Catkin from a Pussy Willow and a Fingerprint. Bottom: Lacy Leaf and Dragonfly by Lisa Goesling

Have you ever noticed how much nature's patterns repeat themselves? I first became truly aware when I was drawing a dragonfly. Not long before, I had completed a black and white scratchboard of a leaf eaten away by bugs. I named it Lacy Leaf because the patterns were so delicate and intricate, just like a fine piece of lace. 

When I began to study the dragonfly, it too had a detailed pattern, much like the leaf. I was stunned by how the same seemingly random shapes fit together to form a majestic dragonfly. 

Just the other day a friend came across one of my scratchboards of Pussy Willows. Her immediate response was, "they look like fingerprints!"

By this point, I was well aware of designs repeating themselves in birds, insects, plants and flowers. What I hadn't considered was that we share similar patterns with the rest of nature. All I had to do was to take a closer look. 

The Nature of Design-Pattern by Lisa Goesling

The Nature of Design-Pattern

Copyright While a bug is different than a rock, their basic patterns are so similar. The repetition of shapes throughout the dragonfly are repeated in the leaves and rock. Shapes, repetition, pattern, line and texture, all fundamental properties of both nature and design.

The Nature of Design-Pattern by Lisa Goesling-Copyright

The Nature of Design-Pattern by Lisa Goesling-Copyright